Best Gazebo Roofing Ideas: Learn More About Available Options To Get Inspired!

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Planning to build a gazebo but not quite sure of what roofing design to use? Worry not, my friend, for I have the ultimate list for you! 

Several posts ago, I reviewed some of the best gazebos available for purchase. However, I know that those who already own a gazebo simply require a few touches here and there. 

This is why I’ve compiled 10 of the best gazebo roofing ideas and options that’ll help you build a roof that suits your style! 

Go With A Classic Four-Sided Roof 

Let’s start this list off with a classic. The above image depicts a four-sided gazebo roof, arguably one of the most popular roofing styles found in gazebos. 

As the name suggests, a four-sided gazebo has, well, four sides! Each side looks quite similar to a mini pyramid. More often than not, all four parts connect to a single point in the middle. It’s subtle, straightforward, and effortless to build. Simplicity at its finest! 

Or You Can Double It Up!

Why settle for only one roof when you can have two? Yes, I’m talking about tiered roofs

Tiered roofed gazebos remind me of ancient-old architecture found in Japan and China. Not only do they look stunning, but they also add an allure of elegance to your backyard. 

Double-tiered roofs have a second, smaller frame atop the main ceiling. They’re often also combined with cupolas or corbels to make the roof’s beauty pop even more. 

Adorn It With Shingles, Shingles, And More Shingles

Shingles are among my favorite gazebo roofing options because they come in many designs, colors, and textures. They could be one-note or a combination of two or three different styles. Or even better, they could resemble wood, tile, slate, or even classic cedar shakes. Your options are practically endless! 

On top of the freedom of variety, roofing shingles are incredibly cost-effective, energy-efficient, and require little to no maintenance. They’re quite durable, as well! 

Shingles, specifically asphalt shingles, can be added to an existing gazebo roof to breathe a new life into it. They’re likewise among the easiest roofing materials to install, which means you don’t have to worry about hiring an expensive contractor if you know the basics of DIY. 

Or Ditch The Roof Entirely  

Some of us don’t like closed roofs and that’s okay! Other than the fact that they look absolutely stunning if done right, open-roofed gazebos aka cantilever roofed gazebos have a surprising number of benefits. 

For one, they create a gorgeous open-air environment that magnifies the filtration of natural light into your gazebo. As a result, open roofs are exceptionally cost-efficient because they don’t require you to install extra lights or turn them on when the sun is out.

If you’re not a big fan of cantilever roofs, you can instead get a partially open roof. These semi-covered roofs offer about 85 percent coverage, similar to what trees provide when you’re under their shade.

How About An Ancient Favorite: An Octagonal Gazebo Roof?

Octagonal roofs look quite similar to double ceilings, except instead of having four sides, they have eight. 

According to American phrenologist Orson Fowler, the very same man who popularized octagonal houses in the 19th century, an octagon’s geometry makes it the “ideal” shape for a gazebo. 

In addition to more living space, Fowler believed that octagonal roofed gazebos naturally let in more light compared to four-sided pavilions. They also apparently remain cooler during the summer season.

Benefits aside, octagonal roofs also look simply astonishing. They’re reminiscent of the Victorian-style gazebo at Fellows Riverside Gardens. While not as elaborate, they’ll undoubtedly give off a beautiful, “dramatic” flare to your backyard.

Or A Classic Wooden Roof?  

Wooden roofs are the first choice for many. Other than the fact that they’re generally more affordable than some other options, they’re also versatile and aesthetically-pleasing. 

I personally believe that wooden roofs are the perfect choice if you have a backyard full of trees and flowers — primarily because they further complement its “natural” look. 

Another great thing about wooden roofs is that they’re easy to repair and replace. Although they’re not as durable as, say, asphalt shingles, they can easily stand the stress of severe weather conditions. Plus, they have superior insulation. What more could you want? 

Go For Iron Roofing For Cooler Summers

Corrugated iron roofing is another popular choice among homeowners, primarily due to its extreme durability. In fact, it’s said that the average life expectancy of corrugated iron roofing is over 50 years! This means that you’ll never have to replace the roof ever again. 

In addition to this, corrugated roofs keep you cool during summer because they naturally send the sun’s UV rays into the atmosphere. In comparison, traditional roofing materials can heat up to 190°F on a hot summer day, with a good portion of heat transferring into the gazebo. 

The initial installation and material cost of corrugated roofs may be quite steep, but you’re paying for high-quality roofing in exchange. Plus, as they’re made of metal, you can bend and twist them to whatever design fits your gazebo — whether it’s four-sided, octagonal, or even flat. 

Or Go Modern And Add A Solar Panel (or 10)! 

Solar panels are among the greatest inventions of mankind. The fact that we can convert the sun’s light into actual usable energy (completely free of charge) still blows my mind today. They’re an investment that quite literally pays for itself

The best thing about solar panels is that they can be used to power anything, no matter how big or small. Instead of installing your panels on your car or house’s roof, why not place them on top of your gazebo? 

On top of that, you won’t have to worry about frequent maintenance and replacement, as most solar panels have a warranty of up to 30 years.

Or Maybe Galvalume Roofs, The New “It Look”?

If you’re looking to add a modern twist to a classic gazebo, adding a galvalume or a hardtop roof may be your answer. I’ve actually written an entire post about it

Galvalume roofing is a combination of three of the most durable metals available to date: steel, zinc, and aluminum. As a result, this type of roof is suitable for extremely harsh weather conditions and environments, including hurricane zones, high and low-temp regions, and areas with constant rain or snowfall. 

Depending on the roof’s thickness, design, and color, galvalume roofs are relatively budget-friendly. But even if they’re not, the material’s durability, flexibility, and rust-resistant properties are an investment worth the price.

If None Of These Options Suit You, How About A Flat Roof? 

Are you tired of the classic triangular or pitched roof design? Mix it up and choose a flat roof instead, similar to several Gazebo Penguin solariums I’ve reviewed before. 

Flat roofs are cheaper to install than pitched roofs because of their plain structure. They also require fewer materials and labor. Additionally, they’re faster and less disruptive to install. 

The materials you can use for flat roofs are practically limitless. You can use wood, corrugated iron, galvalume — the choice is yours! Therefore, if you want a simple, straightforward, easy-to-install roof for your gazebo, flat roofs may be your answer.  

Did The Above Gazebo Roofing Ideas Inspire You? 

I have always loved the look of backyard gazebos. While most of them are Victorian-inspired, there’s virtually no limit when it comes to roof designs. This is why I decided to share some of my favorite gazebo roofing ideas with my lovely readers.

I hope the list above helped you find your gazebo’s new roof design. If it has, leave a comment and let me know what you liked the most. And don’t forget to share with your friends!

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